Gallery House, Philip Leeson Architects
photo Ben Wrigley

What's on 

in the ACT

  • 11 Dec 2017 - ACT Awards Entries Open
  • 2 Mar 2018 - Awards Entries Close

 

 

2019 ACT Architecture Awards Jury Members



 Chair     Sarah Truscott RAIA
 Interstate Juror     Yvette Breytenbach RAIA
 Juror     Anthony Knobel RAIA
 Juror     Malin Paulsson RAIA
 Lay Juror     Toss Gascoigne


 

An image of Sarah Truscott

Sarah Truscott, RAIA

Architect + Interior Designer | Climber + Bushwalker

After growing up in country NSW, Sarah relocated to Sydney to study interior design at the Enmore Design Centre (TAFE). Having been an academic over-achiever at high school, it was immensely satisfying to inform the school headmaster that indeed she would not be attending university as all expected but instead had enrolled in TAFE. It proved a fruitful decision, as the interior design course fostered her critical thinking and approach to creative problem solving.

Sarah enrolled in architecture in Newcastle when realising during her final year of Interior Design that she was designing whole buildings, not just interiors. She later completed her architectural studies in Tasmania, a move not just for the engaging mentors but also the active outdoors lifestyle. She recalls a moment of despair flash across her final year lecturers face when she declared that architecture was only ever going to be half of her life – the other half being a passionate pursuit of experiences in the natural world to expand her design thinking.

…Camp caves (or overhangs if you will) appeal to my inner architect. Most details escape me of my first overnight bushwalk 26 years ago other than a rock shelter we found perched on a hillside overlooking Dunns Swamp. A stonewall at its edge was built-up for shelter, a flimsy window installed for light and an old bed frame inside. For my 11-year-old imagination, this was perfection itself. For many years I dreamt I might one day live in such a simple place…

Sarah is committed to living a diverse life, with varied experiences helping shape her worldviews. Architecture to Sarah will never be viewed as an isolated profession but a collaboration of many, culminating in wonderful moments causing us to pause and appreciate our built and natural environments.


An image of Yvette Breytenbach

Yvette Breytenbach, RAIA

Yvette Breytenbach is a director of Morrison & Breytenbach Architects, Hobart. She is the immediate past President of the Australian Institute of Architects Tasmanian Chapter having filled the roll from 2017 – 2019.

She grew up in South Africa, graduating from the University of Witwatersrand in 1980 with a Bachelor of Architecture, before working in architectural practices in Johannesburg and Cape Town on residential, social housing and urban design projects. In 1988, she completed a Social Science Honours degree at the University of Cape Town. From 1989, she worked on a range of architectural projects in Cambridge, U.K., as well as completing a Certificate of Fine and Applied Art in Ceramics at the City of London Polytechnic.

A lifelong interest in ceramics reflects her delight in materials, texture and play of scale, as well as the experience of carefully crafted objects and spaces. Yvette moved to Hobart in 1991, setting up an architecture practice with James Morrison in 1992. Morrison & Breytenbach Architects has delivered Tasmania’s only two 6 star Green Star GBCA certified buildings to date and the practice integrates a strong social and environmentally sustainable focus into their work. Their architecture has been recognised with multiple AIA Awards and includes arts, educational, residential, university and social housing projects in Tasmania.

Yvette is in her element developing big-picture ideas, conceptualising the potential of projects and facilitating user consultation and engagement which she combines with her particular interest in architecture that enhances the essence of place, is people-centred and value adds beyond the requirements of the brief.


An image of Anthony KnobelAnthony Knobel, RAIA

Anthony Knobel operates out of his architectural studio in a small seaside village on the South Coast of NSW.  His work encompassing rural and urban realms along the coastline and hinterland, and the ACT region.

He completed his bachelor degrees and graduate training in Canberra, however spent much of his twenties indulging in architecture and culture far and wide.  He has studied abroad in Indonesia and the USA and took part in a fieldtrip to India where the works of masters the likes of Corb, Kahn and Doshi really resonated.  Whilst aboard Anthony also resided in the UK and Germany, during which time he was involved in large public infrastructure projects with AEDAS London, before returning to a role at Daryl Jackson Alastair Swayn. 

These experiences received abroad all culminating in the life-long ambition of self-constructing his own home on the South Coast of NSW, sparking a new personal trajectory into bespoke residential architecture.       

His works today exist as a measured approach to sustainable design and high-quality design outcomes with an inherent tectonic expression.  He has received the highest residential accolades at the AIA awards, namely the Malcolm Moir Heather Sutherland Award in 2013 and 2017, and the ACT Chapter Sustainability Award. 

An image of Malin Paulsson

Malin Paulsson, RAIA

Born in Gothenburg, Sweden, Malin was educated at Kingston University and the University of Cambridge, UK. Since graduating in 2001, She has practiced architecture in the UK, Singapore, and Australia. Malin relocated to Canberra in 2010 where she has established a small residential practice.

As an active member of the AIA, Malin has been a member of the ACT Chapter Practice Committee since 2010. On behalf of the chapter she holds the key role as convener of the Practice of Architecture Learning Series. A position she has held since 2015.

During her years in practice, Malin has developed skills in the design of a broad range of building typologies, including large scale residential, civic and cultural as well as single dwellings. Her extensive international experience has cultivated her appreciation of process driven architectural design, and its importance for commercial success and design quality.

Malin maintains a close relationship with the University of Canberra Faculty of Art and Design where she has contributed as a studio tutor and guest juror since 2012. As an educator she holds a specific interest in architectural representation and the human experience of architecture.

 

 


An image of Toss Gascoigne

Toss Gascoigne (Lay Juror)

Toss Gascoigne has watched Canberra grow and develop from a population of 13,000 people.  He experienced the suburb-village model, when each new suburb had a service station and dozen shops, each designated for a specific purpose: newsagent, butcher’s shop or post-office.

He lived through Canberra’s rapid expansion of the Menzies years.  Accompanying this was the construction of modernist houses commissioned by scientists and public servants, and designed by architects including Robin Boyd, Roy Grounds, Sydney Ancher, Enrico Taglietti, Harry Seidler, Theo Bischoff and Noel Potter. 

Houses by Malcolm Moir, Dirk Bolt, Kenneth Oliphant and Alex Jelinek are strong memories of growing up in Canberra.

He worked worked in notable buildings:  CSIRO’s Pye Laboratory on Black Mountain (Ken Woolley) and Roy Grounds’ Academy of Science.

In 2013 the Institute of Architects invited Toss to join a committee to manage the Walter Burley Griffin Lecture.  With Catherine Townsend and Michael Jasper, the committee has worked to restore the Award to its former prominence.

The Lecture is now delivered at the National Press Club and broadcast live by ABC television, and carries a strong message on the benefits architecture and design can deliver to the Australian community.

There is also a radio component: for the last four years the ABC RN program Big Ideas has been taped in Canberra before a live audience and national broadcast.

Toss has a long-standing interest in architecture and events organised by the AIA such as solar house tours.  He and his wife Lyn live in a house designed by Theo Bischoff, the architect who coincidentally designed his parents’ house in Pearce.

Professionally, he is a science communicator, working with CSIRO and heading national advocacy bodies representing the interests of science and researchers.